What is Radiofrequency Neuroablation?

2018-06-18T13:46:47+00:00 June 30th, 2018|Treatments|

You may have never heard of radiofrequency neuroablation before, but it’s highly effective in the pain management world. According to experts, here’s what you need to know.

What is a Radiofrequency Neuroablation?

Radiofrequency neuroablation is a minimal invasive procedure that reduces pain originating from the facet joints of your neck or spine.

How does a Radiofrequency Neuroablation Work?

Heat is used to cauterize specific nerves to interfere temporarily with their ability to send pain signals to the brain. The radiofrequency neuroablation procedure is typically performed after you have demonstrated pain relief from a “test” injection such as a medial branch block.

How is a Radiofrequency Neuroablation Performed?

An experienced pain physician will use a needle-like tube called a cannula and position it into the irritated medial branch nerve area using x-ray or fluoroscopic guidance to ensure treatment accuracy. Once the physician has verified positioning, the radiofrequency electrode is inserted through the cannula. The physical will test the position of the cannula by sending a weak electrical jolt to the nerve. If the weak electric jolt increases the pain without any muscle effects, the electrode is positioned correctly. The physician proceeds use the electrode to cauterize the nerve and this blocks the pain signal from being sent to the brain. The procedure typically takes 60 minutes or less, and patients can leave shortly after their procedure is complete.

How Long Will the Relief Last for?

Many patients report pain relief up to one year or more.

How Often Can I Have a Radiofrequency Neuroablation?

Since nerves grow back, repeating the procedure is necessary.  In many instances patients will have the procedure repeated every 12-18 months.

At Pain Stop Clinics, we use radiofrequency neuroablation to treat head, neck, back, arm, and leg pain. Are you ready to live your life pain-free without the use of drugs? Contact Pain Stop Clinics today and request an appointment with one of our pain experts.